” There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada. Those qualities are what makes us the first post-national state.” -Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (2015). This is the controversial statement that I will be discussing along with answering the question of “Is Canada a nation, simply a country, or a ‘post national’ state’?”. I disagree with this statement because I think Canada is a nation, not a post-national state, but before I can say that, I have to give my idea of what I think a post-national state is; to me post-national means that there is no care for borders and we put other cultures above our own in order to be truly diverse. The question “what if borders were erased and the entire world became ‘transnational?'” came up in an article from The Vancouver Sun – The dangers of a post-national Canada (the article that I will be referring to), which to me the word transnational  would be a better word to describe what Trudeau is talking about. Now I am not saying that we are a transnational state either. If we were a post-national state, as Trudeau claims, then we would have no care for the US-Canadian border; there would be security into the US, but none coming back. Also, if we put other cultures above our own, than really there would be no true Canadian. Which, personally, if someone asks me my nationality, I proudly say Canadian.

The way Trudeau describes it, I hear more multicultural. The former head of the University of B.C.’s Centre for Applied Ethics, Michael McDonald, claims that “being Canadian is like being a member of a community, or a big family. ‘Some are born into the family and others are adopted.”‘ and I think this statement best describes Canada. In a family/ community everyone is different, but we share the same values; maybe not everyone, and maybe not all the time, but enough that we can still can work cohesively together. There will still be people who don’t have the same values as the majority but since they are still part of our family/ community we still respect them. Having this respect for one another, shows “Canada’s particular style of nationalism is […] part of what makes the country attractive to immigrants” and helps with our multiculturalism. Our diversity, respect, and openness to people makes us look like our style of nationalism is ‘healthy’ from the outside and “healthy nationalism encourages diverse people to cooperate” which may be why people always see us for those qualities.

Based off of the evidence that I have read from articles, I return to the fact that I think Canada is a nation. I could argue for the fact that Canada is a country, a piece of land with physical borders governed by a single government, because that is true, but when reading Mcdonald say Canada is like being in a family, and how some are born into it and others are adopted, to me perfectly describes Canada as being a proud nation.